Vegan Camp Risotto

This post is inspired by the lack of vegan camping friendly recipes throughout the online world. It’s really easy to make tasty meals on a camping stove if you are able to get hold of fresh ingredients. Let’s face it, unless you are wild camping you are most likely at a festival or a camp site which will have a shop. You can always bring fresh ingredients with you too.

This is an old recipe of mine that I’ve never written down. The particular measurements for this are larger than normal because I made it for a communal meal with lots of other people. (This is something we often do at Vegan Camp.)

Let’s start with ingredients:

  • 3 organic vegetable stock cubes
  • A whole tub of garlic paste
  • 4 red onions
  • Watercress and spinach salad bag
  • 2 bags of Arborio rice
  • 1 bottle of Sauvignon Blanc white wine
  • ½ a bottle of crisp cider
  • A whole pack of button mushrooms
  • A whole bunch of fresh parsley
  • A big dollop of vegan butter (Also not shown. Perhaps I had, had too much Cornish cider already?)
  • Some rapeseed oil

SAM_0621 SAM_0622

Now here comes the method in my madness:

Place a dash of oil into the pan and heat on full for about a minute, then turn the heat right down.

In the meantime, chop up the four onions and place in the hot oil. Mix well with a wooden spoon.

SAM_0623

Get your little sister to stir the onions whilst you chop up the mushrooms and add them to the pan.

SAM_0624 SAM_0625 SAM_0626

Then in goes the big dollop of vegan butter. Make sure you stir well and then turn up the heat for about a minute whilst you chop the parsley.

Add the parsley, stir and then turn the heat right down again.

SAM_0627 SAM_0628 SAM_0629 SAM_0630 SAM_0631Now add the two bags of rice and mix through so they are totally covered in all the flavours you’ve  been busy creating.

Now add the stock cubes and pour about a glass of wine into the pan, constantly stirring. When it seems that the liquid has been absorbed, add some more wine. Rinse and repeat until the whole bottle has vanished into the void of rice.

SAM_0632 SAM_0633 SAM_0634 SAM_0635 SAM_0636 SAM_0637 SAM_0638

Spoon all of the garlic into the mix and keep stirring.

SAM_0639 SAM_0640 SAM_0641

Turn up the heat and then prepare your salad, adding whatever fresh stuff you have around. I added a cucumber on top. It doesn’t need a dressing.

SAM_0642 SAM_0645

Turn the heat back down and keep stirring. Add some fresh water if the rice becomes too sticky.

SAM_0643 SAM_0644

Give the pan a quick sniff to see if it’s alcoholic enough. If not, add all of the cider and mix through.

SAM_0650 SAM_0651 SAM_0652 SAM_0661

Serve at an epic communal meal, run from all the wasps who want to eat said communal meal…then enjoy!

SAM_0662 SAM_0679 SAM_0678 SAM_0677 SAM_0676

(Cook time approx 35 minutes)

Advertisements

G’s Cafe Bude

Vegan Camp this year was held in a camp site about five minutes outside of Bude, in Cornwall. We are often not very hopeful of finding restaurants or cafes in the remote villages and towns that usually surround camp, but this year we did.

Our first dealings with G’s was after I had seen the group communal meal menu, that was organised for later in the week. It was raining pretty hard outside and I really couldn’t be bothered to cook, so I convinced my little sister Charlotte and my partner Mykey to have breakfast out in Bude. The cafe wasn’t very hard to find and had clearly marked outside that it had vegan options available.

Mykey and I ordered two pots of tea (with soya milk) and Charlotte ordered a soya hot chocolate.

SAM_0603 SAM_0602 SAM_0601 SAM_0598 SAM_0599 SAM_0600 SAM_0596 SAM_0595 SAM_0594 SAM_0593 SAM_0591 SAM_0590 SAM_0592

Mykey also took a hell of a lot of photos of us messing around. *STANDARD*

The cafe was clean, tidy and not very busy when we first arrived however customers seemed to start arriving around 10:30. The atmosphere was lovely and the staff were very knowledgeable and friendly.

SAM_0597

We of course could not help ourselves and had to order the biggest breakfast on the menu. It was called, “The Veggie Ansom.” At £8.95 you certainly got value for money. The breakfast contained, two Redwood’s sausages, two rashers of Redwood’s bacon, three hashbrowns, two slices of toast with soya butter, baked beans, grilled tomatoes and mushrooms. Charlotte had a smaller version, but couldn’t finish it so we ate the rest of her’s too. I’ve not had a breakfast like that for years. A proper holiday treat and absolutely exceptional. We revisited once more for breakfast and once for lunch with sandwiches (spaghetti for Char) and scones and jam with redbush tea. I also haven’t had scones in years because I am rubbish at baking.

SAM_0690 SAM_0694 SAM_0698 SAM_0698 SAM_0695 SAM_0693 SAM_0692 SAM_0691

The staff began to know us by site and always asked how we were and if we were enjoying ourselves. SAM_0604

The best night for food however was when the whole of Vegan Camp went to G’s for a communal meal. The owners and staff really pulled out all the stops.

To start Mykey had a creamy mushroom bruschetta. (Closed cup mushrooms with red onions, port, soya cream and herbs £4.95.) I had a carrot, orange and ginger soup. ( served with warm bread £3.80.)

SAM_0720SAM_0721

Both dishes were full of flavour and tingled the taste buds. We’ve eaten in more expensive restaurants that have not served us starters this good.

Do you know what else is great about G’s? They have an alcohol license and sell traditional Cornish vegan cider. 7.3% I’ll have you know! 🙂

SAM_0722

For the main course, Grandma, Mum and I had the lentil and butternut squash tagine (served with salad and cous cous £7.95.)

SAM_0726SAM_0725

Grandma doesn’t do peppers, but she ate this lot. In fact she wolfed it down the same as my mum and I. It filled us all up, but was light enough to leave space for a pudding.

Mykey and my Dad had a falafel and hummus wrap (served with mixed salad and sweet potato fries £7.25.) Mykey described this dish as, “a massive tortilla stuffed with everything. Yum!” I tried a few bites and I was blown away with the textures and flavours in my mouth. Who ever thought something so simple could be so tasty?

SAM_0724

Then oh my goodness, there was pudding. A rare treat for my family of vegans who are constantly trying to stay fit and healthy.

My mum and dad had the summer pudding (served with soya ice cream £4.95.)

SAM_0732SAM_0733

I’ve never eaten summer pudding before, but I was so happy when loads of berries came flowing out of the middle when I nicked a spoonful from them.

Mykey had an ice cream sundae with summer fruit (£4.95) I thought it was a little basic for the price, but it tasted great none the less. An improvement could have been some chocolate sauce or even some chocolate chips. 😉

SAM_0736 SAM_0734

I think I had the best pudding of all; dark chocolate and ginger torte with ice cream. You can see the look on my face as I’m eating it, that I am enjoying it beyond words.

SAM_0730 SAM_0727SAM_0731

This place is a must visit. Thank-you for making our holiday…and the extra 2 kg on our waistlines. See you soon!

9.5/10

Guy Fawkes: Not what you think.

I was born on the 5th November 1985. Not many people can say that they had fireworks let off as they were born, but I can. I had never learnt much about why my birthday was so important to British history and culture, until recently. I knew the rhyme and I knew Guy Fawkes had tried to blow up the houses of parliament, which is why we all had a big party. Like most people however, I was never quite sure whether I was celebrating the torture and execution of a traitor or the fact that the government and king were almost destroyed.

Guy Fawkes

 

The story goes that King James I ingrained the tradition into British culture so as to make a mockery of any Catholic rebellion against the throne and government. He encouraged the people to create dolls of the pope and burn them on bonfires. Later on this would have evolved in to what we know as a modern celebration with sparklers and fireworks.

 

66666

Since the release of V for Vendetta in 2005, the mask that is supposed to be the face of Guy Fawkes has circulated and infiltrated resistance movements across the world. I’ve seen it at anti-government rallies, peace protests, the London riots, animal rights demos and most recently at the anti-fracking demos. Let me explain to you why, in the most simplest and uneducated way, Guy Fawkes should not be used as a figurehead of any resistance movement, anywhere.

Google Image Search Guy Fawkes

 

Guy Fawkes was born in York in 1570. His father was a protestant, but his mother’s family had catholic sympathies. When his father died in 1579, his mother remarried a couple of years later, this time to a catholic. Guy subsequently grew up catholic influenced by his step-father, his step-father’s family and the school he attended in York.

In October 1591 Fawkes sold the estate in Clifton that he had inherited from his father. He travelled to the continent to fight in the Eighty Years War for Catholic Spain against the new Dutch Republic and, from 1595 until the Peace of Vervins in 1598, France. He became known as a master of war and even changed his name to Guido Fawkes to fit in better with his Spanish comrades.

In 1604 Guy became involved with a group of catholic nobles through an old school friend and his brother Christopher. These nobles planned to assassinate King James I and place his young daughter on the throne as a puppet catholic queen. The assassination attempt failed and so the Gunpowder Plot was born and attempted in 1605. Unfortunately for Fawkes, one of his co-conspirators got cold feet and gave word to a friend in parliament. This lead to the discovery of dozens of barrels of gunpowder and Mr Fawkes himself under the houses of parliament on 4th November 1605.

He was brutally interrogated and tortured before finally being executed in 1606.

Guy Fawkes and his co-conspirators were pro-monarchy. They didn’t like King James I because he wasn’t catholic and imposed various restrictions on practising catholicism. They wanted a catholic king preferably, but a queen who they could marry to a catholic noble of their choice would do. Maybe one of them? Does this sound like the type of people you would want to represent anti-monarchy, anti-aristocracy and feminist movements? Nope!

They were also exceptionally pious catholics, hell-bent on civil and holy war. They had the names and addresses of all Scottish protestant nobles living in London and they had every intention of murdering them and their families, had they not been caught. Guy Fawkes would no doubt have been part of this, given his talent for murder on the battlefield. Is this someone you really want to be a figurehead of peace protests?

I understand that people want to remain anonymous during demos and protests because of police and CCTV surveillance, but before Guy Fawkes, faces were painted black, clown masks were worn and even at a freedom to protest rally I attended in 2008, we had blank masks with green curly hair.

Guy Fawkes was pro-religious piety, pro-state sponsored aggression, a warmonger and certainly not a freedom fighter for anyone other than catholic nobles. It’s time we found someone else who will enter parliament with honest intentions.

(NB, the lack of capitalisation on the word catholic is deliberate.)